MOROCCAN STEW WITH POTATOES, CHICKPEAS, TOMATOES AND SPINACH

moroccan-stew-in-white-bowl

MOROCCAN STEW WITH POTATOES, CHICKPEAS, TOMATOES AND SPINACH

by | Feb 26, 2021

The first thing that comes to mind when I think of Morocco is the spice markets with their colors in full display. Although it’s on my bucket list, I have sadly never visited Morocco. What give this Moroccan Stew its name is the combination of spices including ginger, coriander, cumin, tumeric, paprika and harissa, all of which show up often in Moroccan cuisine. Combined with the chickpeas, potatoes, tomatoes and spinach, this stew makes a hearty plant based meal to enjoy on a cold winter’s eve.

spices-in-spoons
Shantanu Pal at Pexels

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4.75 from 4 votes

Moroccan Stew With Potatoes, Chickpeas, Tomatoes and Spinach

This Moroccan Stew is the perfect anecdote to a cold winter evening. The classic Moroccan spices of ginger, coriander, cumin, tumeric and paprika used to flavor the stew are perfect for a night by the fire.
Prep Time20 minutes
Cook Time30 minutes
Total Time50 minutes
Course: Dinner, Entree, Main Course
Cuisine: African
Keyword: Chickpeas, Dairy free, Gluten free, No oil, Vegan, Vegetarian
Servings: 6
Calories: 279kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 large onion finely diced
  • 2 stalks celery finely diced
  • 2 carrots finely diced
  • 5 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh ginger minced
  • 1 Tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1 Tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon tumeric
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 3 cups chickpeas if canned, about 2 (15 ounce) cans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 yellow potatoes peeled and diced
  • 1 (28 ounce) can/box diced tomatoes
  • 1 Tablespoon harissa sauce Use less or more based on your taste for spice.
  • 2 cups baby spinach
  • 2 Tablespoons parsley as garnish
  • 4 Tablespoons sliced toasted almonds as garnish

Instructions

  • Heat a large heavy pot over medium high heat. Add 2 to 3 Tablespoons of water. When the water bubbles, add the onions, celery and carrots. Stir with a wooden spoon until the onions are translucent. Add a small amount of water as needed to keep the vegetables from sticking to the pan.
  • Stir in the garlic, ginger, coriander, cumin, tumeric and paprika and continue to stir for 30 seconds to 1 minute being careful not to allow the garlic to burn.
  • Add the vegetable stock, chickpeas, potatoes and tomatoes. Stir to combine.
  • Bring the pot to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  • Stir in 1 Tablespoon harissa sauce. Use less or more based on your taste for spice.
  • Stir in the spinach and continue to cook until the spinach is wilted.
  • Garnish with chopped parsley and toasted slivered almonds

Notes

For a heartier meal, serve with brown rice or quinoa.
Please note that the garnishes are not included in the nutrition facts.
The nutrition information below is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s, dietician’s or doctor’s advice.

Nutrition

Calories: 279kcal | Carbohydrates: 44g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Sodium: 550mg | Potassium: 809mg | Fiber: 11g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 4837IU | Vitamin C: 23mg | Calcium: 124mg | Iron: 5mg

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Please leave a comment below and and share a photo on Instagram. Tag @chasingbeans123

You’ll need the following ingredients for this Moroccan Stew With Potatoes, Chickpeas, Tomatoes and Spinach(See the recipe for specific amounts)…

  • Onion
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Coriander
  • Cumin
  • Tumeric
  • Paprika
  • Vegetable stock
  • Chickpeas
  • Yellow potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Harissa
  • Spinach(I have also used kale for this recipe.)
  • Parsley, as garnish
  • Sliced almonds, as garnish
moroccan-inspired-chickpea-stew-ingredients
 moroccan-inspired-chickpea-stew-ingredients
Kale is pictured here in place of spinach.

Heat a large heavy pot over medium high heat. Add 2 to 3 Tablespoons of water. When the water bubbles, add the onions, celery and carrots. Stir with a wooden spoon until the onions are translucent. Add a small amount of water as needed to keep the vegetables from sticking to the pan.

onions-in-skillet
onions-carrots-and-celery-in-skillet

Stir in the garlic, ginger, coriander, cumin, tumeric and paprika and continue to stir for 30 seconds to 1 minute being careful not to allow the garlic to burn. Garlic burns easily which produces a bitter and unpleasant taste.

spices-added-to-skillet

Add the vegetable stock, chickpeas, potatoes and tomatoes. Stir to combine.

tomatoes-carrots-and-chickpeas-in-skillet

Bring the pot to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 20 minutes.

moroccan-inspired-chickpea-stew-in-skillet

Stir in 1 Tablespoon harissa sauce. Use less or more based on your taste for spice.

spinach-added-to-skillet

Stir in the spinach and continue to cook until the spinach is wilted.

moroccan-inspired-chickpea-stew-in-skillet

Garnish with chopped parsley and toasted slivered almonds. For a heartier meal, serve with brown rice or quinoa. Enjoy!

morrocan-inspired-chickpea-stew-in-white-bowl

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Please leave a comment below and and share a photo on Instagram. Tag @chasingbeans123

Things you might like to know about this recipe…

Chickpeas

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are widely available in grocery stores in cans and dried. Many brands offer organic and low salt alternatives. The cans are convenient, but when you cook the beans from scratch you save money, you know exactly what’s in your chickpeas, and you can control the consistency of the finished beans to your liking. You’ll find an excellent article here on how to cook chickpeas on the stovetop, in a pressure cooker or in a slow cooker.

There are 10-15 grams of protein in a cup of chickpeas.(Dried, cooked chickpeas will have more protein.) In addition they contain calcium, iron, phosphorus, folate and fiber. You’ll find a complete nutritional rundown here.

Chickpeas, Canned Or Cooked From Scratch?

I prefer to cook my chickpeas from scratch. Besides being a cheaper alternative to canned, chickpeas from scratch do not have the salt and other added ingredients that some canned varieties do. You can find many blog posts online to walk you through the process. I always make more chickpeas than I need and freeze the rest.

There are various methods to cook them, but they all take some time, and when you’re in a rush, you want to have all of your ingredients handy. To freeze chickpeas, allow them to cool and then transfer them in a single layer to a sheet pan. Place the sheet pan in the freezer until the chickpeas have frozen. Then transfer them to a freezer storage container for easy access in the future.

Garlic


Most recipes including this one measure garlic by cloves. There can be a very big difference in size from one garlic clove to the next. Experiment with the amount of garlic that you enjoy in your cooking, and adjust the amount used accordingly. Here’s a picture of cloves from one head of garlic to illustrate this point.

garlic cloves

Peeling and Grating Ginger


My favorite way to peel ginger is to use the side of a teaspoon to scrape the skin from the root. Use the rounded tip to get into difficult places. Many chefs don’t peel ginger especially if the skin is not particularly tough so don’t worry about leaving a little bit of skin in those difficult spots.


My preference is to grate the ginger with a box grater and then mince it finely with my chef knife. You can also use a microplane for this task and omit the second step of chopping with the chef knife. Many people prefer this method. The reason it’s not my top choice is that I find that the ginger is pulverized almost to a liquid with the microplane.

To freeze ginger, wrap it tightly in plastic wrap. It won’t be crisp, but will be fine for most recipes. Another option for freezing is to mince the ginger, measure it out by teaspoons/tablespoons onto a sheet pan, place the sheet pan in the freezer until each mound of ginger is frozen and then place the mounds in a freezer safe container. You can then retrieve the frozen ginger ready to go when you need it next.

Harissa

Harissa is a spicy chili paste commonly used in Middle Eastern and Northern African cuisine. You can find it in grocery stores and markets in cans, jars and tubes or you can make it from scratch. It is typically made from a variety of dried chili peppers, olive oil, spices and garlic. Varieties of harissa may vary substantially in taste and can run the gamut from mild to spicy.

Potatoes

Potatoes are in the nightshade family along with tomatoes. Mainly composed of carbohydrates with some fiber, potatoes are sometime demonized. When they are prepared correctly, however, they can be a healthy choice. Potatoes are a good source of potassium, folate, and vitamins C and B6, and they also contain some healthy antioxidants. The more color in the potato, the more antioxidants it contains. Many of the benefits of potatoes are in the skin, so consider leaving the skin on when preparing recipes that contain them.

Spinach

Spinach is low in carbohydrates, high in insoluble fiber and an excellent source of carotenoids, vitamin C, vitamin K, folic acid, iron, and calcium as well as antioxidants.  It may improve eye health and help prevent heart disease and cancer. You’ll find more health benefits of spinach here.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes, like potatoes, are members of the nightshade family, but unlike potatoes, they are low in carbohydrates. They contain several vitamins and minerals including vitamin C, potassium, vitamin K, and folate as well as antioxidants. Studies have shown that tomatoes may reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers, and tomatoes may also benefit skin health by helping to prevent sunburn. You’ll find more health benefits of tomatoes here.

Vegetable Stock


I prefer to make my vegetable stock from scratch. It’s quick and easy and doesn’t contain unwanted added ingredients such as salt. If you prefer a supermarket brand, I recommend Better Than Bouillon Reduced Sodium Seasoned Vegetable Base. You can add 1 teaspoon per cup of boiling water to make a cup of vegetable stock and keep the container in the refrigerator for later use. I prefer the flavor to most canned/boxed broths.

Here’s my recipe for vegetable stock from scratch.

VegetableStockIngredients

Water Sautéing


My preference is to avoid the calories in oils whenever possible. Although some oils are healthier than others, one tablespoon contains about 120 calories. Sautéing with water or broth instead of oil is a great way to save those calories, and in the context of this recipe, the flavor will not be affected.


Heat your pan on high and add about ¼ cup of water. Reduce the heat to medium and add the ingredient(s) to sauté. Stir constantly until they reach the doneness that your recipe requires. For example, if you are sautéing onions, you will most often want them to be soft and translucent before adding other ingredients. Continue adding a small amount of water as needed to keep the ingredient(s) from sticking to the pan.

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4 Comments

  1. Alison

    5 stars
    This is one of my favorite recipes! I made it today and forgot to add the spices until I had already added the broth so it is not as flavorful as usual, but I’m hoping over the next day or so it will become more flavorful!

    Reply
    • Rebecca

      Yay!! So glad you like it. I’m sure the flavors will intensify overnight. Enjoy!

      Reply
  2. Erika Chin

    5 stars
    This is definitely a go-to recipe for us! It is so healthy though we may ramp up the spices a wee bit given our personal tastes.

    Reply
    • Rebecca

      YAY!!!!! I love to hear when adaptations are made to suit your own taste buds…..that’s what cooking is all about. Thank you so much for sharing your experience Erika!

      Reply

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